todaysdocument

todaysdocument:

The Vermont Bookwagon and New Hampshire State Library Bookmobile celebrate National Bookmobile Day and National Library Week with a friendly race.

From “The Day the Books Went Blank”, a 1961 educational film intended to show the importance of maintaining quality libraries, from The Library Extension Agencies of the six New England States.

NANANANANANANANANANANANANANANANA

BOOK WAGON!


The story the Wheelchair Photo tells is this: two losers set off bombs, but hundreds of people risked their lives to rush to our aid. The people with me in that picture – Carlos Arrendondo, Devin Wang and Paul Mitchell – aren’t the bad guys. They are the heroes. They are saving my life.
If people talk about the photo this year, I hope they remember that. I hope they remember that the man in the wheelchair, the one without the legs: he lived. He has a fiancée and a baby on the way; he’s learning to walk again; he’s going to be OK.

Jeff Bauman in The Guardian

The story the Wheelchair Photo tells is this: two losers set off bombs, but hundreds of people risked their lives to rush to our aid. The people with me in that picture – Carlos Arrendondo, Devin Wang and Paul Mitchell – aren’t the bad guys. They are the heroes. They are saving my life.

If people talk about the photo this year, I hope they remember that. I hope they remember that the man in the wheelchair, the one without the legs: he lived. He has a fiancée and a baby on the way; he’s learning to walk again; he’s going to be OK.

Jeff Bauman in The Guardian

Bill carried Jane up the five granite steps of their front porch into the foyer, where nearly everything was as they had left it that morning in April. Martin’s bucket of baseballs, his glove and catcher’s equipment, his new baseball cleats and Reebok sneakers, all remained untouched. In the kitchen, Martin’s Red Sox backpack still hung a few feet from his now-famous heart-covered peace poster. Easter baskets remained on Martin’s desk and on the floor of Henry’s room, long after they should have been stowed away.

For Richard family, finding strength

Beautiful piece on the family that lost their boy in the marathon bombing.

npr
npr8:

This is Camden, my 8-year-old son. He was at the finish last year wearing his “my mom is faster than your dad” T-shirt and holding up the sign he had made me. He never got to see me finish. He was sent off into the crowds full of panic and fear. He listened to the adults he was with and did what he was told. He was brave. He tried blocking his ears but the noise was too loud.
Camden thought his mom was “dead.”
In the months after the bombings last year, I would watch him sleep. It brought me back to the first few weeks he was born, when I would stand by his crib to make sure he was breathing.
Last year, I would stand by his bed and cry, knowing that my brave little man never got to show me the sign he made; knowing my race had put him in harms way; reliving the two hours I spent in silence not knowing if he was safe.
I felt guilt and anger.
Camden won’t be at the finish this year. He said “sorry mom, I just can’t go.” I am running Boston to show Camden that his mom is brave and that, with time, he will be able to go to the Boston Marathon again.
He will be able to see a fire truck without looking scared or watch fireworks without jumping into our laps in a panic. He will be able to sit through a thunderstorm without running for cover.
The thought of him not being at the finish breaks my heart and will open up a new stream of emotions. And I am sure when I get home on April 21st, 2014, I will watch Camden fall asleep and I will cry. Tears of happiness that together we did it!
— Amanda Burgess

Wow.

npr8:

This is Camden, my 8-year-old son. He was at the finish last year wearing his “my mom is faster than your dad” T-shirt and holding up the sign he had made me. He never got to see me finish. He was sent off into the crowds full of panic and fear. He listened to the adults he was with and did what he was told. He was brave. He tried blocking his ears but the noise was too loud.

Camden thought his mom was “dead.”

In the months after the bombings last year, I would watch him sleep. It brought me back to the first few weeks he was born, when I would stand by his crib to make sure he was breathing.

Last year, I would stand by his bed and cry, knowing that my brave little man never got to show me the sign he made; knowing my race had put him in harms way; reliving the two hours I spent in silence not knowing if he was safe.

I felt guilt and anger.

Camden won’t be at the finish this year. He said “sorry mom, I just can’t go.” I am running Boston to show Camden that his mom is brave and that, with time, he will be able to go to the Boston Marathon again.

He will be able to see a fire truck without looking scared or watch fireworks without jumping into our laps in a panic. He will be able to sit through a thunderstorm without running for cover.

The thought of him not being at the finish breaks my heart and will open up a new stream of emotions. And I am sure when I get home on April 21st, 2014, I will watch Camden fall asleep and I will cry. Tears of happiness that together we did it!

— Amanda Burgess

Wow.

committeetoprotectjournalists
committeetoprotectjournalists:

marketinginfographics:
A Colombian press association sent 52 tons of newsprint to three Venezuelan dailies that are struggling to go to print because of paper shortages.
Since August of last year, at least 10 Venezuelan dailies have gone out of print, while at least 11 have had to reduce their size, according to human rights organization Espacio Publico. Venezuelan newspapers are having a hard time importing newsprint, which isn’t produced locally, because of government-imposed restrictions on obtaining U.S. dollars

See also: In Venezuela, the Only Free Media Is Twitter


Fascinating. These papers are closing because they’re running out of paper, and not the green kind.

committeetoprotectjournalists:

marketinginfographics:

A Colombian press association sent 52 tons of newsprint to three Venezuelan dailies that are struggling to go to print because of paper shortages.

Since August of last year, at least 10 Venezuelan dailies have gone out of print, while at least 11 have had to reduce their size, according to human rights organization Espacio Publico. Venezuelan newspapers are having a hard time importing newsprint, which isn’t produced locally, because of government-imposed restrictions on obtaining U.S. dollars

Fascinating. These papers are closing because they’re running out of paper, and not the green kind.